Career

There were two professions I wanted to be when I grew up. The first was a nurse.  Well, the nurse idea bit the bullet long before it was a full-fledged glimmer in my eye. I thought I wanted to be a Candy Striper at a local hospital. You know, deliver some flowers, get an extra blanket and fluff a pillow. I was allll excited to do this UNTIL the person who was training me told me there was a morgue in the hospital. Whaaa? A morgue IN the hospital? Cue the heebie jeebies for this little 16 year old. I could feel my face whiten and something akin to panic start in my stomach. I had a severe case of ‘flight, fight or freeze.’  I took flight. I couldn’t burn out of that hospital fast enough.

I don’t know why I was so traumatized by the thought that there were bodies in a hospital. I mean, did I think everyone got better? Maybe. I don’t know. I don’t know why I had such a major reaction to that little tidbit of news. I DO know it took me months to return my Candy Striper uniform.  😉 I was just that freaked out. That effectively ended my thoughts of being a nurse.

The other profession was an actor (back then women were called ‘actresses’ and men were ‘actors’). Now that one DID take flight. I loved being on stage and acting. I loved it. I had a real affinity for it. I performed in plays throughout my high school years and then musicals after I graduated.  Yes, I said ‘musicals’ and yes, I sang. In public. Without the aid of a shower. To lots and lots of people. Me. Singer. Once upon a time.

While I was in high school, my DECA teacher told me he set up an interview for a part-time teller position at a local bank. Ok. Coolio.  Up until then my main source of income was as the “World’s Richest Babysitter” as one family lovingly called me and working in the camera section of White Drug. Banking? Why not?

Little did I know that interview would be the start of my 21-year career. I moved from being a teller to the Consumer Lending side. There I processed loans but I really, REALLY wanted to be a loan officer. Not much later I became a Direct Consumer Lending Underwriter. It was better than a Loan Officer (in my eyes) as I didn’t have to deal with customers. I dealt with branch personnel who dealt with customers. I loved, LOVED that job. But, as you fellow bankers know, time marches on in the acquisition world of banking and my beloved bank was taken over by another.

I moved on to a few different positions until my final position as an Internal Auditor for the ND branch offices.   I tell ya, I have an eye for detail and I was goooooood at picking up on what people wanted to hide. I didn’t even know I was an intuitive back then.

Long story short, I was quite happy in banking. I didn’t have a college degree as I opted to go full-time right out of high school. I was being promoted regularly so I must have been doing something right.  My dad finally quit saying, “You should go to college” after I received my fourth or fifth promotion. That was a relief because college never did hold any appeal to me. I completely get where my dad was coming from. He knew how important a college degree would be even back in the early 80’s.

Fast forward to 2001. My banking career is over. I was burned out and didn’t want to go back into banking. I just felt restless, like there was something else for me. I received a great severance payment so I was comfortable taking some time off to heal from the loss of my marriage, job and career.   I worked at what I called, ‘fun networking’ jobs but, as usual, I was bored rather quickly.  Interesting fact about me, once I figure things out I am bored by the repetition of it all.

I just didn’t know what I wanted to do. Can you imagine? At age 17 I was in what would become my career. I didn’t job hop. I stayed with the same bank. So what to do for the old benjamins. What to do…..

Oh gee. I think I’ll open up a business that is based on energy work. And, oh yeah, I’m going to incorporate intuitive messages with this energy work. Yep, that goes over really well in a conservative, conventional, meat and potatoes kind of life.

But I did it. My mom was gone by then and I was scared to tell my dad. Bless his beautiful heart, he said, “Well, I guess that’s alright. Will you be able to support yourself?”   I smile at this memory as my dad is gone now too, and I totally understand what he was and wasn’t saying.

Sometimes life takes turns that you wouldn’t even dare think about. If someone had told me I’d be finished with my banking career at age 38, I wouldn’t have believed them. But look how beautifully this was all orchestrated. Can you imagine all the events or things that had to go into making this happen? I left a very comfortable, acceptable, sound career and started one that is very esoteric, un-logical and incredibly rewarding.

While I may not be in the acting profession, I’m very comfortable delivering the channeled messages, being in front of a crowd or in the spotlight. I may not be a nurse, but I am helping to heal people. Doing my Work fulfills both my childhood aspirations. Interesting how it all worked out, huh?

Ain’t life grand?

 

 

Perkins

We were returning from a family vacation and were hungry so we decided to stop at Perkins. It was an easy on, easy off for the two road warriors plus une petite bebe.

We sat at a table like every other table. Our server was sweet and efficient.  We entertained our daughter with crayons and cheerios.  She, then officially one year old, entertained us by throwing everything within her reach.

She smiled at an elderly gentleman and he smiled back. His energy was kind and gentle. He played peek-a-boo with her from his table. She giggled and giggled and kept looked over her shoulder at him.

I was worried our daughter would annoy him as she kept smiling and pointing. He was enjoying dinner with his misses. Well, I assume it was his wife as they had an easy cadence about them. The kind you can only get after 50 some years of daily life together.

Each and every time I snuck a peak in his direction, he was smiling and playing peek-a-boo with her. She was thoroughly enjoying herself and it appeared he honestly was, too.

As our meal ended and theirs continued, I was struck with a thought that we needed to buy their meal. This is not uncommon for my husband and I as we often practice random acts of kindness like this.  I said to my husband, “I think we should buy their meal.”  His eyes widened and his mouth dropped open slightly and he stammered, “I, I was having the exact same thought!  But I was wondering if we should just buy their drinks or do the whole meal with tip.”  I said, “If we both had the same thought at almost the exact same time, there must be a reason. No coincidences, right? Let’s buy their meal.”

We quietly told our server what we wanted to do. She looked surprised and then broke into a smile and said, “That is SO sweet. How nice of you!” We paid for our meal and for theirs and left the restaurant feeling really, really good. There’s something about secretly doing something nice for someone that makes you just feel good, you know? It’s also nice to wonder how good the recipients of your random act will feel and if they’ll pay it forward.

About five miles down the road, out of the blue, I was struck by a thought that our daughter orchestrated the whole, “you should buy them their meal” business.   Nahhhh, the logical side of me said, it couldn’t be.  She couldn’t have told us both to buy their meal. Could she?! How could she do that?! She’s just a year old (tsk, tsk, Melissa…like chronological age has anything to do with anything except on the physical plane). As I thought about it, it was the only thing that COULD have happened. It was the only thing that made sense.   And I’m pretty sure my earlier ‘thought’ was really an intuitive ‘hit.’

My eyes widened, my hand went to my mouth and I said with wonderment, “I think love bug did that! Back there at the restaurant. I think she told us to buy grandpa and grandma their meal. Think about it. We both had the same thought at almost the exact same time and she was having so much fun with grandpa. It HAS to be her.” He was quiet for a few seconds and then he said, “Yep. I agree.”

Almost immediately, his voice broke into a smile and he said, “What are we going to do with her when she’s a teenager? Is she going to telepathically tell us that she wants a pony and you and I are going to be powerless to stop her? Or what if she telepathically tells us to forget about her curfew? What then!?”

He was joking, of course, because mind-control is not part of telepathy, unless you’re in an X-Men movie.  But really, what do I know? I was just schooled by a sweet little, unassuming one year old that hadn’t even uttered her first intelligible word.

Michelle

I really try hard not to do my energetic or intuitive Work outside of session. I really, really do. In my early days, prior to me opening up my business, I found myself giving Reiki to anyone and everyone. It didn’t matter if they’d asked for it. Reiki is just such a beautiful gift to give, I couldn’t imagine why anybody would NOT want to receive it. Standing in front of me in the grocery store? Here, have some Reiki. It’s on the house. Stuck in traffic? Here you go, blue Toyota, you might like a little burst of energy.  But, as I became more knowledgeable about Reiki, I became more respectful of it. I came to accept that giving Reiki without permission took away a person’s power and thusly, I stopped.

Sometimes, SOMETIMES though, there is a person whom I can’t quit thinking about. I call it my ‘spidey-sense’ and it usually means this person has been thinking about me, on some level, as well.  This person is someone I know either from my Work or on a personal basis. It’s never a stranger and it’s usually someone’s energy that I’ve felt or worked in before.

About two weeks ago, I was sweating and grunting in my gym’s Group Power class. I happened to make eye contact with one of my friends and fellow sweater/grunter. I knew in an instant something was wrong. Her energy was just off.  I, trying to remain true to the values I hold so dearly, didn’t say a word to her. There have been a few cases where I’m literally so shocked by the information I hear, that I have to open my yapper and ask the individual about it NOW.  But, for her, I left the gym without saying a word.

The next week the same thing happened again. I didn’t even have to make eye contact this time to know. I saw her energy and the feeling I received was stronger this time. Something was off. It was as if she had a lot of troubles on her mind or was dealing with some heavy personal issues. I, again, didn’t do anything about it but I thought about her constantly that week.  That, in itself, told me something. When I can’t get you out of my melon, I must be tellin’. 😉

Today, I decided I had to approach her. I’d sat with it long enough and still felt the pull to reach out. She is familiar with my Work and has known me, personally, for years. I mean this woman and I have pumped iron together side by side. If that doesn’t qualify as knowing someone, what does???

I told her I really didn’t like to do my Work outside of session, but I couldn’t shake the feeling that sometime was wrong. I just felt like she needed a hug. I asked her how I could help or what I could do.  She shut the office door and told me a little bit about what had been going on for the last couple of weeks.  I apologized for the energetic intrusion and she told me she was thankful.

The feeling that someone is in emotional/mental/physical distress doesn’t always happen to me. I’ve been in one group fitness room or another for years (check out my biceps! Gun show, anyone?!) and the need to reach out, without permission, has happened a handful of times. I’m learning to pay more attention to when it does happen, as either I need to help someone or someone needs to help me.

The thing is, some of us are really good at hiding our feelings or emotions from others. Some of us do it in order to be perceived as professional. Some of us do it for self-preservation. Some of us do it to be thought of as strong. Some of us do it because we can. I get it. I know. Whatever the reason, there’s always someone who is willing to help you.  The question is, will you find them or will they find you?